Sutures and Drains



10.1055/b-0034-91238

Sutures and Drains


Surgical suture materials and surgical drains are part of routine surgical work. Only the most important aspects are listed here.



Sutures



Suture Material


The history of surgical sutures goes back a long way, with varying degrees of success. In the middle of the 19th century, organic suture materials (“catgut,” actually made from sheep intestine or silk thread) were introduced together with the principles of asepsis, though some of these materials were already familiar in antiquity. These suture materials, particularly catgut, are no longer used today in European gynecology. The synthetic suture materials in common use today are classified as absorbable or nonabsorbable, and monofilament or polyfilament.


Modern surgical sutures are usually firmly swaged to atraumatic needles. In gynecology, atraumatic needles are used in over 95% of all operations. “Traumatic” needles, where the suture material has to be threaded, are now reserved for exceptional situations.


Although there are standards in most hospitals, though often not set down in writing, the surgeon can always decide which type and strength of suture he or she will use, and when, within certain guidelines.





































































































Sutures in gynecology and obstetrics

Trade name


Substance


Properties


Manufacturer


Examples of use


Biosyn


Polyester consisting of glycolide (60%), dioxanone (14%) and trimethylene carbonate (26%)




  • Absorbable



  • Monofilament


Tyco


Skin suture


Dexon


Polyglycolic acid




  • Absorbable



  • Poly- or monofilament


Tyco



Maxon


Polymer consisting of polyglycolic acid (62%) and trimethylene carbonate (38%)




  • Absorbable (slowly)



  • Monofilament


Tyco


Fascial suture


Monocryl


Polyglecaprone 25




  • Absorbable (slowly)



  • Monofilament


Ethicon


Skin suture


PDS


Polydioxanone




  • Absorbable (slowly)



  • Monofilament


Ethicon


Fascial suture


Serafit


Polyglycolic acid




  • Absorbable



  • Polyfilament


Serag-Wiessner



Vicryl (different coated subforms)


Polymer consisting of glycolide and polyglactin




  • Absorbable (moderately fast)



  • Polyfilament


Ethicon


The most widely used absorbable surgical suture


Dacrofil


Polyester




  • Nonabsorbable



  • Polyfilament


Braun


Fixation of a Redon drain


Ethibond


Polyethylene terephthalate with polybutylate coating




  • Nonabsorbable



  • Polyfilament


Ethicon


Colposacropexy, vaginal suture


Mersilene


Polyethylene terephthalate




  • Nonabsorbable



  • Polyfilament


Ethicon


Sacrospinal fixation


Prolene


Polypropylene




  • Nonabsorbable



  • Polyfilament


Ethicon


Skin closure


Seralon


Polyamide




  • Nonabsorbable



  • Monofilament


Serag-Wiessner



Terylene


Polyester




  • Nonabsorbable



  • Polyfilament


Serag-Wiessner


Paravaginal or for colposacropexy


Ticron


Polyethylene terephthalate




  • Nonabsorbable



  • Monofilament


Tyco


Only gold members can continue reading. Log In or Register to continue

Jun 18, 2020 | Posted by in GYNECOLOGY | Comments Off on Sutures and Drains
Premium Wordpress Themes by UFO Themes