Normal Standards





The following compilation of normal measurements is set forth as an aid in determining whether or not a given feature is abnormal. Such data may be especially useful when the visual impression is potentially misleading. For example, when the nasal bridge is low, the visual impression may falsely suggest ocular hypertelorism; when the patient is obese, the hands may appear to be small. Besides comparing patient measurements with these normal cross-sectional population standards, it may be important to contrast the findings of the patient with those of his parents or siblings in an attempt to determine whether or not a given feature is unusual for that particular family.


These measurements have been obtained predominantly from whites; hence, they may not be accurate for other racial groups. Separate data are presented for males and females, except for features that do not show significant differences between the sexes. For paired structures, the measurements are given for the right side. Many of the charts were kindly supplied by Dr. Murray Feingold from his Boston study of normal measurements. For normal measurements of structures not included in this chapter, the reader is referred to Hall and colleagues’ Handbook of Normal PhysicalMeasurements . 1


Standards for Height and Weight


The growth charts for children ( Figs. 4.1 to 4.12 ) were developed by the National Center for Health Statistics in collaboration with the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.




FIGURE 4.1


Weight-for-age percentiles: girls, birth to 36 months.

Developed by the National Center for Health Statistics in collaboration with the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion [2000].



FIGURE 4.2


Length-for-age percentiles: girls, birth to 36 months.

Developed by the National Center for Health Statistics in collaboration with the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion [2000].



FIGURE 4.3


Head circumference–for-age percentiles: girls, birth to 36 months.

Developed by the National Center for Health Statistics in collaboration with the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion [2000].



FIGURE 4.4


Weight-for-age percentiles: boys, birth to 36 months.

Developed by the National Center for Health Statistics in collaboration with the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion [2000].



FIGURE 4.5


Length-for-age percentiles: boys, birth to 36 months.

Developed by the National Center for Health Statistics in collaboration with the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion [2000].



FIGURE 4.6


Head circumference–for-age percentiles: boys, birth to 36 months.

Developed by the National Center for Health Statistics in collaboration with the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion [2000].



FIGURE 4.7


Weight-for-age percentiles: girls, 2 to 20 years.

Developed by the National Center for Health Statistics in collaboration with the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion [2000].



FIGURE 4.8


Stature-for-age percentiles: girls, 2 to 20 years.

Developed by the National Center for Health Statistics in collaboration with the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion [2000].



FIGURE 4.9


Weight-for-age percentiles: boys, 2 to 20 years.

(Developed by the National Center for Health Statistics in collaboration with the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion [2000].

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Jun 28, 2021 | Posted by in PEDIATRICS | Comments Off on Normal Standards
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